Construction is the largest industry in the world. Within a Civil Engineering context, ‘construction’ may refer to bridges, dams, earthworks, foundations, offshore structures, pipelines, power stations, railways, retaining structures, roads, tunnels, waterways and water/wastewater infrastructures. within a Mechanical Engineering context, on the other hand, ‘construction’ may refer to airframes, aircraft fuselages, boilers, pressure vessels, motor coaches, railroad carriages, cranes, elevators and ships.

Anything constructed needs to be designed first. Structural Engineering deals with the analysis and design aspects required to ensure a safe, functional and economical end product. During the design process the designer may constantly interact with specialists such as architects and operational managers. Once the design is finalized, the implementation involves people to handle aspects such as statutory approvals, planning, quality assurance and material procurement. The entire exercise can be undertaken in a highly-coordinated way if everyone involves understands the terminology or ‘project language’. To understand this language fully, it is necessary to appreciate the principles of structural analysis and design.

Participants in this course will gain a basic knowledge of structural engineering that includes the principles of analysis of structures and their application, the behaviour of materials under loading, the selection of construction materials, and the design fundamentals for Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC) and steel structures. The emphasis will be on the determination of the nature and quantum of stress developed under  loads, and the way structures offer resistance to it. Being the most widely used construction materials, RCC and steel will be covered in detail, though masonry and timber are also introduced. 

NB: The course description of all EIT "Certificate" courses has been changed to "Professional Certificate of Competency". Some course brochures are not yet updated. The actual certificate received by successful students will include the new title.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of this course you will be able to:

  • Fully understand the role of a structural engineer
  • Predict the behaviour of structural members under loading
  • Understand the concept of stress functions such as tension, compression, shear and bending
  • Perform a basic analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures
  • Analyse the deformation of members under Loading
  • Understand the significance of material properties in design
  • Undertake the basic design of Reinforced Cement Concrete (RCC) structures
  • Undertake the basic design of steel structures
  • Undertake the basic design of masonry structures
  • Undertake the basic design of timber structural members

Course Outline

Module 1: ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY DETERMINATE STRUCTURES I

  • Classification of structures
  • Types of loads
  • Stress in structural members
  • Types of supports in structures
  • Equilibrium of bodies

Module 2: ANALYSIS O F STATICALLY DETERMINATE STRUCTURES II

  • Bending moment and shear force
  • Effect of moving loads
  • Analysis of pin-jointed frames

Module 3: PRINCIPLES OF STRENGTH OF MATERIALS I

  • Mechanical properties of materials
  • Development of internal stresses
  • Flexural stresses in beams
  • Relationship between horizontal and vertical shear

Module 4: PRINCIPLES O F STRENGTH OF MATERIALS II

  • Determination of bending shear stress
  • Deformation of beams
  • Combined stresses

Module 5: ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURES I

  • Structural classification based on degree of indeterminacy
  • Principle of superposition
  • Analysis of statistically indeterminate beams
  • Multi-span or continuous beams

Module 6: ANALYSIS OF STATICALLY INDETERMINATE STRUCTURES II

  • Slope deflection method
  • Moment distribution method
  • Influence line diagram for statically indeterminate structures

Module 7: DESIGN THEORIES AND LOADS

  • Stress-strain relationship for different materials
  • Design philosophies
  • Combination of loads
  • Theories of failure

Module 8: DESIGN OF STEEL STRUCTURES I

  • Properties of structural steel
  • Steel structural sections
  • Design of steel structures
  • Joints and fasteners for steel structures

Module 9: DESIGN OF STEEL  STRUCTURES II

  • Design of tension members
  • Design of compression members
  • Design of beams
  • Design of truss and allied structures

Module 10: DESIGN OF RCC STRUCTURES I

  • Properties of concrete
  • Principle of reinforced concrete design
  • Design norms for reinforced concrete beams
  • Design of reinforced concrete slabs

Module 11: DESIGN OF RCC STRUCTURES II

  • Design of reinforced concrete foundations
  • Design of axially loaded columns
  • Pre-stressed concrete
  • Multi-storied buildings

Module 12: DESIGN OF MASONRY AND TIMBER STRUCTURES

  • Masonry structures
  • Design of masonry structures
  • Strength of timber
  • Design of timber structures

 

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How can an e-learning course be interactive?

Boredom can be a real danger, however, we use an interactive approach to our e-Learning – with live sessions instead of recordings.  The webinar software allows everyone to interact and involves participants in group work; including hands-on exercises with simulation software and remote laboratories where possible.  You can communicate with text messages, or live VoIP speech, or can even draw on the whiteboard during the sessions.

 

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