IDC- Online News

  1. Student Story: Wilbard Mwetulundila

    Wilbard Mwetulundila is a marine electrician working on a mining vessel for diamond mining company Debmarine. He is an Engineering Institute of Technology graduate and esteemed alumni. He has an unwavering love for engineering, and despite the challenges he has had to overcome, he is developing into a skilled engineer.

    It all started with the boyhood curiosity that grips so many: a fascination with technology.

    “I was raised in a small village in the northern part of Namibia,” he said.

    “When I was a toddler, I used to be very fascinated with battery-operated toys and how they operate. Since then, I have had persistent curiosity — I always had a picture of myself working in an engineering space. Given that burning passion, it was just a matter of putting in the effort to fulfill my dream”.

    Upon completion of high school in 2008, Wilbard applied to study electrical engineering at one of the local universities in Namibia. He, unfortunately, did not get admitted on to the course he wanted to complete. It was a sudden turn of events for him which culminated in him having to enroll for another option.

    However, he vowed that he would pursue a career in engineering by all means necessary. He dropped out of the course and took up a general electrical course at the local vocational institute.

    Graduating in 2012, Wilbard went straight into employment. He began work for Namibia’s Elgin Brown & Hammer as a marine electrician. After gaining experience there for two years, he moved on to work for SABMiller Namibia, a multinational brewing and beverage company.

    At SABMiller, he completed a course on SANS 10142 installation rules, which was a prerequisite to obtaining a wireman’s license so that he could formally become a professional certified electrician. At SABMiller, Wilbard saw that automation was taking over the electrical engineering field.

    “I realized that it is imperative anyone in this field needs to cultivate a good understanding of automation in order to remain relevant. It is also necessary that one masters the basics of electrical engineering before tackling the automation part.”

    Wilbard wanted to keep expanding his career and find new and exciting challenges. He wanted to go back into the marine industry while trying to find an institution that could further help him learn about the electrical engineering industry and the automation world. He went to work for Debmarine in Namibia in 2016. Debmarine is Namibia’s leading marine diamond mining company.

    To further augment his skills and keep growing in his career, Wilbard decided in July 2018 to enroll for the 52726WA - Advanced Diploma in Applied Electrical Engineering (Electrical Systems). He doubled the course up with a national diploma in electrical engineering from a college in South Africa.

    “I had been working for close to 7 years in the electrical industry before enrolling with EIT. Given the years of experience, I was under the impression that I knew it all, but one module into the course, I realized that my knowledge was only limited to the environment I was working in. Since then, I started seeing technical aspects from new perspectives.”

    Wilbard says that his employer has been amazed by his improved workmanship and consistent compliance with engineering ethics - which he all chalks up to EIT’s training. He says he has become more productive and developed critical thinking skills.

    The world is Wilbard’s oyster, as he decides what his next chapter is going to be. He says he is closer to achieving his career goals than ever before. For now, he is applying everything that he learned in his advanced diploma course:

    “Life has been amazing ever since I left EIT. At this stage, I am still figuring out what I am going to do next, but I am thankful that EIT offers support to students even after graduating, and hence I still keep in touch with lecturers.”

    Wilbard has floated the idea of doing a Bachelor of Science (Electrical Engineering) with EIT in 2021. In the meantime, he is enjoying his fulfilling job, where his daily challenges include maintaining, repairing, supervising, analyzing, and enhancing the electrical systems on-board the marine vessel. We wish him well in his future adventures.

  2. EIT lecturer 3D prints protective equipment to combat COVID-19 in the Phillipines

    Human ingenuity, and hobbyists — that’s what the world needs right now, aside from the medical professionals who are on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. 

    As hospitals around the world rush to take stock of the medical equipment they have at their disposal, engineers and engineering companies have been finding ways that they can contribute to the fight against COVID-19. 

    It turns out that the hobbyist engineer who has a 3D printer at home could potentially be an integral player in manufacturing items that can help secure public health. Kasey Martin, our in-house developer at the Engineering Institute of Technology (EIT), is putting his 3D printers to good work. 

    He currently works in the Philippines, which has put contingency plans into place to mitigate the spread of coronavirus. They are now in enhanced community quarantine, meaning the government has imposed a strict home lockdown with only essential movements for necessities and health services permitted. 

    “There has been an increase in checkpoints and uniformed personnel on the streets enforcing the quarantine. There has also been a rise in patients admitted to our health facilities. There is a great demand for any form of personal protective equipment (PPE),” he said.  

    Kasey had procured some 3D printers (the AnyCubic i3 Mega, the Creality CR-10, and Creality CR-2020) in a previous project that saw him printing parts for a weather station. When he heard that there was a shortage of PPE for the health workers and other essential workers, he jumped into action. He frantically searched for 3D printing templates for face shield frames. 

    One of the first considerations when printing a face shield frames is what filament to use and how fast it can be printed. Another factor is how safe the filament is for human use. 

    He explained, “For faster rollouts and ease of prints (easiest of all filaments types to use), we use standard PLA filaments. PLA stands for polylactic acid that is a bioplastic that usually comes from cornstarch as its raw material. It does not have any fumes (as opposed to ABS plastic) when printing, so it is safe for printing 24/7 in an enclosed office during this crisis.”

    They then accessed open source templates that could be plugged into the 3D printers’ software. 
    “This is where the fun story starts. While thinking of a way we can help our front liners with alternative PPEs, we came across a Facebook group of 3D printing hobbyists. They were calling for help in 3D printing face shield frames that could be fitted with acetate sheets.”

    “These face shields would then be given to front liners in the field and health centers nationwide. They did mention that, at first, the model required 3 hours to print. But the community also chipped in and gave them more optimal 3D printer profiles that made the frame print in a little over an hour!” 

    The frame before the optimization.

     

    The frame after optimization.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The crowdsourcing nature and the refining process has led to a much better-printed frame and enabled the printers to print quicker. The first iteration of the frame proved unsafe to use in a situation involving a COVID-19 patient. 

    To make a safer frame, he utilized a manufacturing methodology he learned from a mechanical engineer friend of his: topology optimization. He explained: 

    “Topology optimization mathematically optimizes your material layout based on certain constraints you put into it, like material load, for example.”

    After optimizing the design and sticking to the directions of what would be safest to prevent essential health professionals from getting COVID-19, they produced a much safer frame.

    The benefit of the new design was that a pair of frames could be printed at once, on a 200x200mm print bed. They posted their findings to social media and got positive feedback from friends in the medical field. Kasey and his team simply put a 0.52 mm ‘roofing’ on the frame that, if worn, would prevent any dangerous droplets from entering the shield. 

    The team managed to get a pair of frames printed in 40 minutes. Kasey has been sleeping over in the office to ensure that they produce as many frames as possible. 

    “We can produce about 50-60 face shield frames per day. We do most of our printing as fast as we can during the daytime, starting new prints every 1.5 hours. At nighttime, we slow down a bit and schedule prints every 3 hours so that we don’t mess with our sleep too much. Sleep is essential during the crisis. We can’t help other people if we get sick as well.” 

    Kasey says that other hobbyists can get involved in creating quality PPE equipment for health officials. Developing nations are specifically seeking assistance from the public. 

    “We have shared our modified design on Thingiverse so everyone who wants to contribute can freely download and get their printers to work. We are also in the works of forming an alliance of 3D printing hubs that should help cater to the number of requests we’ve been getting from various groups requesting these face shields.”

    You can find Kasey’s design here.
     

  3. Build a Learning Organisation Today

    Dear Colleagues,

    Dr Jack Welch, a feisty chemical engineer,  died earlier this month. You may not  know who he was as he disappeared from the corporate scene a decade or so ago. He was the driven CEO of General Electric (or GE) – highly successful in growing the company to great heights – in fact, to one of the largest manufacturing and industrial companies in the USA (and indeed, the world). Whilst he was undoubtedly successful as a businessman, his argument on the need for the GE company to be a learning organisation resonates most with me.

    It is arguably easier to dig stuff out the ground as a miner than to keep innovating with new products in a manufacturing organisation when one thinks of the huge competition from the likes of China. Certainly, miners have the challenge in that  the prices they receive for their ore is predicated by buyers in a world market. One only needs to see the current impact of the dramatically lower oil price making the vast US-based shale fields uneconomic. However, if you are digging up a commodity in demand (e.g. rare earths); it is hard for any other firm to compete unless they have access to this ore. Manufacturing however does need continual improvements in one’s products and a huge level of innovation to stay in business.

    Hence, Jack Welch’s concept of GE being a learning organisation to allow for constant innovation makes huge sense.

    Long Term Advantages

    Jack felt that the only way a company could build a long term advantage over its competition was to become a learning organisation. This meant that every organisation has to empower each member of that organisation to continually learn, share knowledge and skills with others and then to use this knowledge in building better products and services. There must be an incredible thirst and enthusiasm for learning and innovation to build up the firm’s intellectual capacity. 

    Key Concepts

    The idea behind a learning organisation is the need for everyone to keep learning new things. This is probably quite chaotic and indeed, anarchic in that many new approaches learnt may invalidate current ways of doing things. This means a fight to find the best solution and often a fairly dynamic work environment; but ultimately it means innovative products which make for a prosperous company.

    It is important that managers drive the learning by example without fear. There is naturally the risk that you invest in training and educating employees that leave for better opportunities elsewhere. The opportunities for the organisation presented by encouraging learning are simply too good to worry about this aspect. 

    Learning isn’t just about attending a formal training course – this may be only a small part of the learning process. Learning is about encouraging the acquisition of knowledge and skills through mentoring, industry forums, the internet and a myriad of other more informal sources. 

    Learning is a slow uneven process with clear gains not always evident. One just has to be persistent and encourage a culture of learning and sharing knowledge. And in looking at opportunities to innovate. 

    Finally, in the application of learning to improving processes in search of better products and services there are often failures. This is all part of the learning process and should be acknowledged and accepted. 

     Jack’s comments included:

    Some of Jack Welch’s more famous commentary:

    "Each morning, I want every person at GE to know that two things will happen that day:

    * Today, I will learn something from another GE employee, supplier or customer that will help me do my job better.

    * Today, I will teach, support, mentor, advise and support the learning of a fellow GE employee.

     Thanks to Elliot Masie for an interesting reflective piece on Jack Welch – a sometime contentious businessman but a visionary engineer.

    Yours in engineering learning

    Steve

     

     

  4. COVID-19 Information

    Last Updated: 31 March 2020

    This page provides information and advice for the EIT community on COVID-19. We encourage you to review this page regularly.

    Online Student Information

    We will post essential information and updates to our online student community via our regular channels including this website page, emails and newsletters. 

    For all general enquiries, please contact your Learning Support Officer via phone or email.

    How is EIT responding to COVID-19?

    In order to look after the safety (and long-term success) of our students, the Engineering Institute of Technology has appointed a COVID-19 Task Team and are monitoring the situation very closely.  As an Australian headquartered organisation, we are following the advice provided by the Australian government and its agencies who we believe have taken a proactive and decisive approach in implementing measures to reduce the spread of the virus.

    Our COVID-19 task team is led by our HR Manager, Ms Lisa Chisari and is ably assisted by Ms Caroline Patterson, our Compliance and Education Manager.  Please be reassured that we are here to support you and will send you regular communiques regarding developments via our regular channels including this website page, emails and newsletters. 

    Will EIT continue to deliver their online programs?

    EIT is delivering our online programs as usual. In a time of global volatility, your education is a key asset in securing your future and as members of our online learning community, you are well placed to continue with your studies amidst the current turmoil.   We have over 15 years’ experience in delivering our unique, live online methodology that makes use of interactive webinars, an international pool of expert lecturers, dedicated learning support officers, and state-of-the-art technologies.  Irrespective of the challenges COVID-19 present us, we have contingency measures in place to ensure we that we will continue to safely deliver our programs across the world. 

    How should I respond to COVID-19?

    We encourage you to stay calm and to focus on keeping yourself, your family and friends healthy and safe. We also suggest you identify a few trustworthy sources of information and focus on that advice over the coming weeks and months.  As members of the EIT community, we also respectfully ask you to demonstrate leadership and assist others if they need it.

    It is important to prevent the spread of germs by thoroughly washing hands, sneezing/coughing into elbows and staying away from work if you are sick.

    Further details from the Australian government can be accessed here.

    Current On-Campus Student Information

    We will post essential information and updates to our on-campus student community via our regular channels including this website page, emails and newsletters. 

    For all general enquiries, please contact our Student Services Manager, Miriam Munitz on 0459 677 212 or at student.services@eit.edu.au.

    Latest Update

    EIT is committed to the safety of our students and staff during the ever evolving situation surrounding COVID-19. As such, from Monday 30th March 2020 on-campus students will be temporarily moving to our online learning environment. If you are a current on-campus student, all the information you need is available on the HE-OC Student Homepage on Moodle.  The Moodle login can be accessed here. This will include the recording and slides from the live information session we held announcing the move on 27 March 2020.  If you have any questions please contact Student Services student.services@eit.edu.au or HE support hesupport@eit.edu.au.  

    Our on-campus students will be well supported through this period because unlike other education institutions, the Engineering Institute of Technology has 15 years experience delivering our unique, live online delivery methodology that makes use of live and interactive tutorials, an international pool of expert lecturers, dedicated learning support officers, and state-of-the-art technologies such as remote and virtual laboratories, and simulation software.  

    These arrangements will be reviewed at the end of April and any updates will be provided accordingly at this time.

    Can I travel to and from Australia?

    Australia’s Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, has announced that Australia will close its borders to non-citizens and non-residents from 6pm AWST Friday 20 March, 2020 in a bid to contain COVID-19.  This means that non-residents, non-Australian citizens will not be able to enter into Australia in the immediate future.   Please be reassured that student and holiday visa holders already in Australia can remain in the country.  However, the ban does mean that people with student and holiday visas who are currently out of the country will be unable to enter Australia.  We understand that this may cause you some anxiety and wish to reassure you that the EIT family is here to support you.  Please contact our Student Services Manager, Miriam Munitz if you have any concerns.  You can contact her on 0459 677 212 or at student.services@eit.edu.au.  Further information from the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs can be accessed here.

    How is EIT responding to COVID-19?

    We are aware that you will be feeling a sense of trepidation because of the presence of the virus, known as COVID-19. As governments around the world monitor and respond to the outbreak, we understand how difficult it is being far from home.  We are committed to looking after your safety and have appointed a COVID-19 Task Team who are monitoring the situation very closely.  As an Australian headquartered organisation, we are following the advice provided by the Australian government and its agencies who we believe have taken a proactive and decisive approach in implementing measures to reduce the spread of the virus. 

    Are EIT campuses open?

    EIT is committed to the safety of our students and staff during the ever evolving situation surrounding COVID-19. As such, from Monday 30th March 2020 on-campus students will be temporarily moving to our online learning environment. If you are a current on-campus student, all the information you need is available on the HE-OC Student Homepage on Moodle. This will include the recording and slides from the live information session we held announcing the move on 27 March 2020.  The Moodle login can be accessed here If you have any questions please contact Student Services student.services@eit.edu.au or HE support hesupport@eit.edu.au.  

    Access to our Melbourne campus is now by appointment only, in line with the state government recommendations around stage 3 restrictions in Victoria. If you have a critical reason to come to campus, you must contact Student Services (student.services@eit.edu.au) before you attend campus and we will discuss your options. 

    EIT’s Perth campus will have minimal critical staff in attendance for the month of April. If you have a critical reason to come to campus, you must contact Student Services (student.services@eit.edu.au) before you attend campus and we will discuss your options. 

    All student meetings will be conducted online (including those with Student Services, LSOs etc.), but please email us or call if you have any questions at all. 

    Our on-campus students will be well supported through this period because unlike other education institutions, the Engineering Institute of Technology has 15 years experience delivering our unique, live online delivery methodology that makes use of live and interactive tutorials, an international pool of expert lecturers, dedicated learning support officers, and state-of-the-art technologies such as remote and virtual laboratories, and simulation software.  

    These arrangements will be reviewed at the end of April and any updates will be provided accordingly at this time.

    Who can I ask for help?

    As part of the EIT family, please also remember there are many support services available to you. 
    Our Student Services Manager, Miriam Munitz is here to assist you if you have any concerns.  You can contact her on 0459 677 212 or at student.services@eit.edu.au

    What should I do to protect myself and others from COVID-19?

    It is important to remember to practice good hygiene – cover coughs and sneezes, stay home if you are unwell and washing your hands often.  We urge you to seriously consider avoiding any international travel for the foreseeable future. If you are expecting visitors from overseas or planning a trip home, please let us know your plans by contacting Student Services. It is important to note that if you are travelling or returning to Australia, you may not be able to enter Australia or will be required to self-isolate for 14 days. This applies to all travelers, including Australian citizens. 

    What information can I access about COVID-19?

    Further information for on-campus students regarding COVID-19 can be accessed via the Study in Australia website or the Department of Education, Skills and Employment dedicated COVID19 website.

    Further general COVID-19 information from the Australia Government is available as follows:
    • To access the Australian Government COVID-19 Whatsapp channel, go to: aus.gov.au/whatsapp
    • To access the Australian Government Coronavirus app, search for "Coronavirus Australia" in the Apple App Store and on Google Play
    • To access updates from the Australian Department of Health visit their website here.

    Prospective On-Campus Student and Education Agent Information

    We will post essential information and updates to our education agent community via our regular channels including this website page, emails and newsletters. 

    For all general enquiries, please contact our International Education Agent Coordinator, Caroline Mackay +61 401 014 273 or Caroline.Mackay@eit.edu.au.

    Latest Update

    Australia’s Prime Minister, Scott Morrison, has now announced that Australia will be closing its borders to non-citizens and non-residents from tomorrow (Friday 20 March, 2020) in a bid to contain COVID-19.  

    Please note that the Engineering Institute of Technology will still be accepting and processing on-campus applications as per normal for our July 2020 intake. Please be reassured that if there are still travel restrictions in place for the mid-year intake, your student will  be able to commence their studies via our online delivery and then continue their studies on campus once they are able to. EIT has been delivering online programs, utilizing our unique delivery methodology for over ten years. 

    Further information from the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs can be accessed here.

    Prospective On-Campus Student Information Webinar - Thursday April 2

    Have questions? We are running a Student Information Webinar on Thursday 2 April with Indumathi V, EIT’s Deputy Dean. Students can register to attend here.

    How is EIT responding to COVID-19?

    As members of the global education community, we share a sense of trepidation because of the presence of the virus, known as COVID-19. As governments around the world monitor and respond to the outbreak, we understand you may have experienced disruption in assisting students with their international study goals.  EIT are committed to looking after the safety of our students and have appointed a COVID-19 Task Team who are monitoring the situation very closely.  As an Australian headquartered organisation, we are following the advice provided by the Australian government and its agencies who we believe have taken a proactive and decisive approach in implementing measures to reduce the spread of the virus. 

    What happens If my student’s visa is granted, but there is a travel restriction for the July 2020 intake?

    On 15 March 2020, the Australian government advised that all travelers arriving from overseas will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.  If this measure is still in place for our July 2020 intake, or if other countries have placed a travel ban, we wish to advise you that our students will be able to commence their program of study through our online methodology until it is safe to travel to Australia or physically attend on-campus. 

    Irrespective of the challenges COVID-19 present us, we have contingency measures in place to ensure we that we will continue to safely deliver our bachelor’s and master’s degrees to our student community.

    Can students defer to the following intake if they don’t want to continue with the July 2020 intake?

    Yes. The next intake is February 2021 intake.

    How will students be supported while studying in Australia?

    We wish to reassure you that all our students can access a wide range of support services when in Australia. Our on-campus students have been contacted to reiterate the support services available to them. 

    What information can I access about COVID-19?

    Further information regarding COVID-19 can be accessed via the Study in Australia website or the Department of Education, Skills and Employment dedicated COVID19 website.

    We firmly believe – as with previous crises – that we will emerge stronger and wiser from the experience when it does eventually pass. I believe that we will demonstrate to you – our valued supporters – that we can rise to the occasion and continue to deliver an outstanding educational experience.

    Staff and Contractor Information

    We will post essential information and updates to our staff and contractor community via our regular channels including this website page, emails and Teams updates.  For immediate assistance, please contact our HR Manager, Ms Lisa Chisari or Ms Caroline Patterson, our Compliance and Education Manager on +61 8 9321 1702.

    How is EIT responding to COVID-19?

    We are aware that you will be feeling a sense of trepidation because of the presence of the virus, known as COVID-19. As governments around the world monitor and respond to the outbreak, we understand that you are experiencing disruption in your professional and personal lives.  

    In order to look after the safety (and long-term success) of all of our valued staff, we have appointed a COVID-19 Task Team and are monitoring the situation very closely.  The team is led by our HR Manager, Ms Lisa Chisari and is ably assisted by Ms Caroline Patterson, our Compliance and Education Manager.   As an Australian headquartered organisation, we are following the advice provided by the Australian government and its agencies who we believe have taken a proactive and decisive approach in implementing measures to reduce the spread of the virus.   Please be reassured that we are here to support you and will send you regular communiques regarding developments via our regular channels including this website page, emails and newsletters. 

    What happens with COVID-19 escalating in some countries?

    Irrespective of the challenges COVID-19 present us, we have contingency measures in place to ensure we that we will continue to safely deliver our professional certificates, diplomas and higher education degrees across the world.   

    Many you may already work remotely, and we have now implemented measures to allow all EIT staff to work from home should they prefer to do so. 

    For those who are still working from a campus or office, in the event that we receive advice from the government that everyone must self-isolate and you cannot return to work, you will receive an SMS from EIT advising you that you cannot come to work accompanied by instructions to attend an online meeting/teleconference to receive further information from EIT.

    In a time of global volatility, education is a key asset in securing an individual’s future. We can all be satisfied that our students, whether on-campus or online, are well placed to continue with their studies amidst the current turmoil.   We have over 15 years’ experience in delivering our unique, live online methodology and are uniquely placed to support our students and our own learning and development.

    What is the EIT travel policy?

    • All work-related travel will not be permitted up until 16th April 2020. We will review the situation again on 16th April 2020. If you have existing travel booked for work, we will look at this on a case by case basis.
    • Personal travel is your own decision, please note the following:
    • If you feel even slightly unwell on your return from travel, do not come back to work until you feel 100% better.  If you are situated in Australia and have travelled overseas, you must self-isolate for 14 days before returning to work.
    • If you travel to another country and are forced into quarantine in another country, you can continue to use your annual leave. In these cases, EIT may allow you to go into a negative leave balance, if required.
    • If you contract COVID-19 the standard sick leave policy applies, as it would with any illness.
    • If you are advised to self-isolate at home, but are not unwell, you can work from home. We will need to sight official government documentation informing you to self-isolate.

    What should I do to protect myself or what should I do if I become sick?

    We encourage you to stay calm and to focus on keeping yourself, your family and workmates healthy and safe.  As members of the EIT community, we also respectfully ask you to demonstrate leadership and assist others if they need it. 

    For those of you who work on campus or at an EIT office, please do not come to work if you feel unwell in any way.  Or, if you work remotely, please advise your line manager if you cannot work as soon as it is reasonably possible.

    It’s important that we prevent the spread of germs by thoroughly washing hands, sneezing/coughing into elbows and staying away from work if you are sick. We also need to stop the spread of inaccurate or ‘sensationalised’ information regarding COVID-19, as this can cause anxiety in some people as well as confusion.

    Further details can be accessed here.

    We firmly believe – as with previous crises – that we will emerge stronger and wiser from the experience when it does eventually pass. I would like to reiterate to you, our incredible and valued staff, that we can rise to the current challenges and continue to deliver an outstanding educational experience.

  5. Student Story: Mikkaela Hughes

    Mikkaela Hughes is an Engineering Institute of Technology graduate who recently earned her 52810WA – Advanced Diploma of Mechanical Engineering Technology. Mikkaela rose above adversity to pursue her career in engineering, and her story proves there is not just one pathway to take you from studying to the workplace, but that there are many approaches that can lead to success.

    Mikkaela currently works in the tank manufacturing and refurbishment industry in South Africa. She is responsible for ensuring that her company provides products that comply with the design requirements set by clients. Mikkaela is fascinated with engineering because of the problems it presents.

    “I am a very open-minded, creative, and passionate individual who thrives on challenges and complexity. I feel that the field of engineering stimulates me and challenges me daily as I get to encounter many challenges on a daily basis, and hence grow from them,” she said.

    Mikkaela began studying mechanical engineering on a full-time basis in 2010, but due to financial restraints and life getting in the way, she was not able to continue her studies. As a result, she determined that she needed to start working.

    “I started working in the engineering/construction management field in 2012, at the tender age of 20, and have been in this industry for about seven years now. During this time, I have been fortunate enough to be exposed to various aspects of the engineering field.”

    While she hit the ground running with work, she began new academic endeavors as well. She completed her Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Project Management Certificate during this time, as well as a Welding Inspection Diploma. At work, she gained exposure to pressure vessels, piping, structural steelworks, civil works, painting inspection, boilers, tankage fabrication, and maintenance as well as progressive tracking and resource allocation and planning.

    Mikkaela managed to bring herself out of a difficult situation, equip herself with necessary skills and practical knowledge, and become a better practitioner in the engineering industry. With her previous industry experience, she began studying her 52810WA – Advanced Diploma of Mechanical Engineering Technology with EIT.

    “I was highly impressed by the course content, which was so diverse and touched on many engineering aspects. This course covered content that I have not seen at other institutions. I was also impressed by previous students’ testimonies.”

    Mikkaela says that her employers have been positive about her EIT qualification, and she is now determined to continue her academic journey and further enhance her career.

    “Life after EIT has been blessed! I feel more confident in my working environment and more knowledgeable. Due to the completion of this qualification, and many more to come, I definitely see many doors being opened. I see myself maturing in this field and every aspect of engineering.”

    She says that there is always a challenge to endure and solve in engineering - she maintains that it builds character and motivates her to keep going because she won’t rest until problems have been resolved. So far, her journey in engineering might have been different, but she has been able to gain momentum in her career.

    “There were many challenges that stood in my way to complete my qualification. These included working 12-hour shifts seven days a week, financial setbacks of which I was not working for six months in 2018, having to relocate three times for work purposes, as well as the pressures and challenges and setbacks of life in general. But, my main goal was to persevere and complete my qualification and become the best engineer to pave the way for future engineers, particularly women in engineering.”

    Determined to succeed, Mikkaela has done everything in her power to exact her own unique career progression. Her determination has been nothing short of impressive - but the journey isn’t over yet. She is considering several options that EIT presents in terms of degrees and certificates, so she can continue to build on her already substantive skill set.

    “I would definitely encourage young people to pursue a career in the field of science, technology, mathematics, and engineering if they have an aptitude and passion for this field.”

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