This practical course covers all the essentials of process control and tools to optimize the operation of your plant and process, and regards the process, from the primary measuring device, through the controller, right down to the final control element as a chain with important links. Controllers need to be carefully matched to the process to work optimally; this matching procedure is called tuning. Controllers that are not correctly configured and tuned will not perform optimally and will not reduce variability in the process as they should. It is aimed at engineers and technicians who wish to have a clear, practical understanding of the essentials of instrumentation and final control elements typically found in common loops. It incorporates loop tuning, as well as how to optimize the operation of their particular plant or process. Mathematical theory has been kept to a minimum with the emphasis throughout on practical applications and useful information.

But it does not stop there. Advanced Process Control (APC) is an essential part of the modern plant. Small differences in process parameters can have large effects on profitability; get it right and profits continue to grow; get it wrong and there are major losses. Many applications of APC have pay back times well below one year. APC does require a detailed knowledge of the plant to design a working system and continual follow up along the life of the plant to ensure it is working optimally. Cascade Control, Feedforward control, control with long dead times, IMC and MPC are all considered, with respect to different applications. At the end of this course you will have the skills to troubleshoot / tune / deal with / understand a wide variety of process loops.

WHAT YOU WILL LEARN:

Registrations for the March 16th, 2014 intake are now open – contact us now

 

The Programs

  1. Calculating the process gain
  2. Dealing with P, I and D, both individually as well as in combinations, in various loops
  3. Stability aspects
  4. Ziegler Nichols open loop tuning
  5. Ziegler Nichols closed loop tuning
  6. Cohen-Coon tuning
  7. Pessen tuning for some / no overshoot
  8. Trial and error tuning
  9. Saturated and non-saturated output limits
  10. Cascade control
  11. Cascade control with one primary and two secondaries
  12. Ratio control
  13. Feedforward control
  14. Dead time compensation
  15. Gain scheduling
  16. Model predictive controller


COURSE OUTLINE

MODULE 1: PROCESS CONTROL INTRODUCTION, BASIC TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

MODULE 2: BASIC CONTROL CONCEPTS

MODULE 3: LOOP TUNING PRINCIPLES: BASIC PRINCIPLES OF CONTROL SYSTEMS

MODULE 4: STABILITY AND CONTROL MODES OF CLOSED LOOPS

MODULE 5: INTRODUCTION TO SENSORS AND TRANSMITTERS

MODULE 6: INTRODUCTION TO CONTROL VALVES

MODULE 7: SPECIALIZED CONTROLLER SETTINGS AND GOOD PRACTICE: IDEAL PID VS REAL PID

MODULE 8: GOOD PRACTICE FOR TUNING OF CLOSED LOOP CONTROL

MODULE 9: LOOP TUNING PRINCIPLES AND STABILITY: CASCADE CONTROL

MODULE 10: FEEDFORWARD CONTROL

MODULE 11: EXPERT SYSTEMS AND MODEL BASED SELF TUNING CONTROLLERS

MODULE 12: MODEL PREDICTIVE CONTROL (MPC)

 

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